The Strengths of Introverts

 

You’re in a meeting with the rest of your team.

Someone starts off with an issue they are having, and how they perceive it should be addressed.

Then the person to your left chimes in with their solution, and how the first speaker’s idea was wrong from the start.

But that gets questioned by a third team member, who jumps in on the conversation before the proceeding idea was even finished.

Back and forth the conversation goes, with most of the members talking over each other to be heard, and you try and take it all in as best as you can – listening to everyone’s opinions, finding the strings of clarity and good ideas in everything that is being said.

Before you know it, the half-hour allotted to the meeting is up, and everyone starts packing their things up to head out. But there’s one problem – you hardly spoke a word the entire meeting.

You listened intensely to what was being said, and have a great handle on what went on in the meeting: what went right, what can be improved, and how to synthesize that information into a direction the group should take next.

But that was never expressed to the team, and you are now perceived as a passive member who they should just delegate tasks to, instead of being seen as a contributing thought leader.

———-

Introverts often get a bad rap. They’re viewed as passive, nerdy, not communicating well, and even having low confidence and self-esteem. These assumptions are mostly based off of common characteristic traits of quiet people that get distorted through today’s popular lens of extroversion, and are viewed as weaknesses – traits that hold reserved people back, getting in their own way of continued personal growth. 

Continue reading

Book of the Month, July – Million Dollar Consulting

 

This is a new segment I’m thinking of introducing to the page, simply titled: Book of the Month (BoM). Pretty self-explanatory. I’ve done a couple book reviews in the past, but want to make this more of a consistent piece by quickly going over the best of what I have read over the course of the past month. The objective is to provide insights from each book that can be useful and applicable in your life, not review the actual subject matter or writing style of the books. Its about finding the nuggets of wisdom from the pages, not just general information. So without further ado:

Million Dollar Consulting

OverviewMillion Dollar Consulting

Potentially the most straight-forward title I have seen on a book in a long time, Million Dollar Consulting is a book written precisely on that subject. Written by Alan Weiss, a very successful consultant in his own right, this book details how to create and grow your own successful consulting practice, with an emphasis on a personal practice, not forming a company. It is not the most beautifully written book, and can be very repetitive at times, as if the author anticipated that people would jump from chapter to chapter. But what it lacks in prose, it makes up for in substance. Writing beyond just the consulting industry, the author details out the mentality that is required to become a self-made millionaire, a mindset that is valuable to have whether you actually want a million dollars or not

Key Concepts

As I mentioned, while the book is technically written on the consulting industry, there is a lot of value to be taken away that can be applied to any area of life.

The major concepts in this book are that to have success, you have to have integrity, build relationships, and focus on growth. Form your own personal strategy for what you want in your life, and stick to it, no matter what other opportunities may come your way.

Continue reading