3 Big Takeaways from ‘How to Win Friends and Influence People’

How to Win Friends and Influence PeopleThe quintessential development book for social interactions, Dale Carnegie’s 1936 classic How to Win Friends and Influence People has gone on to sell over 30 million copies worldwide since its release, and is listed as a one of the Top 25 most influential books of all time by Time Magazine. And while the book does stand the test of time to deliver some solid advice on social interactions, the entire premise of the book can be boiled down into a few points, three to be exact. At just under 300 pages, it is a quick enough read that it would still be worth reading over for yourself, but here is a quick primer on the key takeaways, some of the building blocks for interacting both at work and at home.

 

Executive Summary: The book boils down to two main concepts in line with the title. How to Win Friends = Make people feel important. How to Influence People = Make them want to do what you want them to do out of their own volition. And in all things, be diplomatic with people. The high road will always pay dividends in the end.

Key Concepts:

  1. Be Diplomatic
    1. Don’t criticize (will only upset the other and make them defensive)
    2. Praise often, at every improvement in others
    3. Don’t call direct attention to others mistakes, and lead with your own mistakes before discussing the other’s mistake
      1. Say “I may be wrong, and frequently am, so let’s examine the facts” (not word for word though)
      2. Make their faults seem easy to correct, always encourage – “I make that mistake all the time
    4. Even when you are right, win people gently and tactfully to your way of thinking, don’t try to bowl them over with the force of your correctness
    5. Ask questions instead of giving orders
    6. Good manners are made up of petty sacrifices” – Emerson
  1. Make the Other Person Feel Important
    1. Do this by making them feel appreciated
    2. Remember their name, find out what they like. Ask questions
    3. Nourish other’s self-esteem same as you would nourish their bodies by giving them food
    4. Give titles and authority to people, even if they are really meaningless. Again, makes them feel important, and brings out the nobler character within them
      1. This is something that Napoleon Bonaparte was famous for with his soldiers. Even called them the Grande Armee, as an example.
  2. Influence by Making People Want to Act of Their Own Accord
    1. Give them what they want. Focus on how they will benefit from what you want, and frame the request in that manner
    2. Galileo Quote: “You can’t teach a man anything. You can only help him to find it within himself”
    3. Respect others opinions, don’t directly say they’re wrong.
    4. Admit your wrongs, and if wrong, admit it quickly. Don’t pass the blame on others
    5. Get the other person saying “Yes, Yes”
      1. Socratic method of asking questions to reason their way into your way of thinking
    6. Appeal to their nobler motives
      1. Give the other person a reputation to try to live up to
    7. Sympathize with others ideas, and try to see their point of view
      1. So they don’t feel alone. No one wants to feel alone
    8. Tell a story. Dramatize your idea (Think of Malcolm Gladwell. Great ability to take dull scientific data and weave it into a captivating story that drives home the key points you would otherwise gloss over)

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Other Notes / Quotes

  • When dealing with people, let us remember that we are not dealing with creatures of logic; we are dealing with creatures of emotion, creatures bristling with prejudices and motivated by pride and vanity.”
    • Win the heart first, then the head
    • Win a man to your cause by first convincing him you are his sincere friend. There is the “honey which catches his heart, the great high road to his reason“.
  • 99% of the time people don’t criticize themselves for anything
  • “Be wiser than other people if you can, but do not tell them so”
  • Everything we do springs from two motives (According to Sigmund Freud):
    • 1) Sex urge
    • 2) The desire to be great/important
  • Alfred Adler – “It is the individual who is not interested in his fellow men who has the greatest difficulties in life, and provides the greatest injury to others. It is from among such individuals that all human failures spring”
  • People don’t want to feel sold. They want to buy. Similar to the main concept of The Little Red Book of Selling
  • At one point in the book there is a story of woman, new at her job, who is not making any friends or acquaintances
    • Finally tells herself “Maria, you can’t expect these women to come to you, you have to go out and meet them”
    • Takeaway is that in a new situation, the onus is on the new person to go out and meet the existing people. Be a self-starter, don’t be dependent on others to feel included
  • Good quote – “Do not fear being misunderstood and do not waste a minute thinking about your enemies. Try to fix firmly in your mind what you want to do, and then, without veering off direction, you will move straight to the goal. Keep your mind on the great and splendid things you would like to do, and then, as the days go gliding away, you will find yourself unconsciously seizing upon the opportunities that are required for the fulfillment of your desire … Picture in your mind the able, earnest, useful person you desire to be, and the thought you hold is hourly transforming you into that particular individual. Thought is supreme
  • Be forceful and assertive whenever you meet someone new to introduce yourself, and then remember their name in the future. Alleviates ice, puts you on friendly terms right away.
  • Unrelated thought from the rest of the book, but a concept that I still found meaningful: Andrew Carnegie was limited in his steel making knowledge. He just knew how to manage, lead, and organize people who knew more than he did.
  • Advocates that if lack of experience, not lack of ability, is reason for failure, then this is ok
  • Overlook people’s faults, even if they are overwhelmingly glaring
    • Instead, focus on even the little things they do right and praise those things.
    • Praise the improvement, and they will take heart in that, gain confidence, and turn other aspects around as well
      • However, this is mostly oriented toward people with little experience, new people. Not pre-established relationships
  • If accurate, good quote: “All men have fears, but the brave put down their fears and go forward, sometimes to death, but always to victory” – King’s Guard in Ancient Greece

 

I hope you find these notes to be useful and thought-provoking. Again, these are just my takeaways from the book and don’t encapsulate the entire message. If you’re interested in delving deeper and reading the book for yourself, and want to support the page, you can grab a copy here.

And if you want even more, here is a list of books within the same topic (social interactions) that I have found useful:

Happy Reading

 

How to Read for Knowledge

Reading AnalyticallyReading of any kind is important work, and a critical element to the development and evolution of the human psyche.

It’s how you expose your mind to new ideas, it captures the human imagination. You can find the entirety of the human experience within the confines of a single library.

But to harness the full potential of these opportunities, one must elevate their level of reading beyond just processing words on a page – you have to read analytically.

How many times have you read a book, and a month later can’t recall a single thing about it? Or you finish a well renowned book, but feel as if nothing sunk in.

Maybe you can remember some concepts, but in nominal value only; you know what the book said, but not what it meant. The ideas haven’t sunk in enough for you to be able to readily apply them to your everyday life without going back and re-reading part of the book.

You gained more information, but you didn’t get any wiser.

“If we encounter a man of rare intellect, we should ask him what books he reads”

– Ralph Waldo Emerson

If you want to really grow and expand your capacities, and capitalize on the time end effort you are putting into your reading efforts, one must engage in specific styles of reading.

The three levels of reading:

  1. Reading for Entertainment – This is your prototypical novel reading. The intent is not to learn anything new, but simply to enjoy the story or what the author has to say.
  2. Reading for Information – This is what we are typically taught to do in school. You are focused around learning information on a new topic, or maybe getting an in-depth look at a topic you have already been introduced to. You’re learning what you didn’t know before
  3. Reading for Knowledge – This is reading for concepts and ideas. You are going beyond learning some new information, and are instead focused on internalizing what you are reading to alter some part of how you think.

Now each of these styles certainly have their appropriate time and place; I’m not advocating that you never read a mystery novel again.

But we are here in the pursuit of growth, and growth involves evolution. You have to internalize what you are reading to derive the intellect and enlightenment required to expand your capacities.

At the third level of reading, you’re not just reading the words as they are on the page. You are taking them off the page and into your own head; bringing your own personal experience into what you are reading, or maybe the reverse: taking the words you are reading and testing how they might apply to various circumstances that have occurred in your life.

What you read should become a part of how you think.

When you read analytically, this is the desired result: that the topics, ideas, and arguments from various books become ingrained in your head and become a part of your intellect.

You can recall ideas from what you have read instantaneously, and you find yourself bringing these various themes to bear in your everyday life and decision making.

This third style of critical, analytical reading involves several practices that are typically overlooked:

The first is reading slowly, not for speed

Speed reading is most useful for Level 2 reading activities, when you are just trying to gain some level of understanding about a particular concept (just-in-time information).

But that is not our objective here. We are after knowledge, not just information (this is the ‘recall’ ability mentioned before).

We want to fully engage ourselves with what we are reading, wrestling with what the author is saying and what our experiences tell us, with the objective being that the material becomes integrated into our decision-making process.

To do this, you have to take your time with each book to let it soak in. It’s better to read four books a year that change some of your perceptions of the world, than to read one hundred books and remember nothing but the titles, subject matter, and how quickly you finished each one.

This is your education, not a contest.

The second practice is taking detailed notes

Again, this goes beyond note taking on factual information (dates, names, ages), and should be more focused around what you are thinking or taking away from the passages in the book. Mark key passages or quotes, and record the thoughts that come to mind, or connections you begin to make with other books or life experiences.

How you take these notes is largely up to personal preference. Everyone has their own unique twist on a note taking system that works best for them.

Whether it’s highlighting, writing in the margins, flagging pages, or keeping a separate journal to write in, detailed note taking forces you to engage with the author and the words you are reading. You can start wrestling with the book, and correspondingly, the author, and analyze whether you agree/disagree with what you are reading, and therefore how it is impacting your worldview.

 “The only important thing in a book is the meaning that it has for you”

– W. Somerset Maugham

This all culminates in a state of active reading – reading for concepts, ideas, and insights, not just for factual information or entertainment. When you read a book on Napoleon Bonaparte, what is important is not when he took the throne as Emperor. No one is going to quiz you on which islands he was exiled to.

What is important is how he revolutionized the military strategies and tactics of his age, and executed on them. How he gained near absolute loyalty from both his troops and the larger French population, despite bringing France back into a monarchical fold on the heels of the Revolution. What lessons in leadership can be gained from his final defeat at Waterloo (one example: his generals had lost their ability to take initiative, after years of Napoleon’s micro-managing and thinking for them).

These are ideas that you can bring into your decision-making models, and alter how you interact with others on a daily basis (ie. limit micro-managing. The short term benefits are far outweighed by the cumulative negative effects that are eventually realized over the long haul).

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When you read analytically, you’re wrestling with the ideas presented to really internalize what is being said. You read slowly and intently to thoroughly process the argument or story, and what your takeaways are.

Only then will what you read become a part of who you are, and shape the way you see the world. The ideas that you read will stick with you long after you have set the book down, and you will come to find that you have in fact grown just a little bit wiser, with each passing page.

 

 

Book of the Month, July – Million Dollar Consulting

 

This is a new segment I’m thinking of introducing to the page, simply titled: Book of the Month (BoM). Pretty self-explanatory. I’ve done a couple book reviews in the past, but want to make this more of a consistent piece by quickly going over the best of what I have read over the course of the past month. The objective is to provide insights from each book that can be useful and applicable in your life, not review the actual subject matter or writing style of the books. Its about finding the nuggets of wisdom from the pages, not just general information. So without further ado:

Million Dollar Consulting

OverviewMillion Dollar Consulting

Potentially the most straight-forward title I have seen on a book in a long time, Million Dollar Consulting is a book written precisely on that subject. Written by Alan Weiss, a very successful consultant in his own right, this book details how to create and grow your own successful consulting practice, with an emphasis on a personal practice, not forming a company. It is not the most beautifully written book, and can be very repetitive at times, as if the author anticipated that people would jump from chapter to chapter. But what it lacks in prose, it makes up for in substance. Writing beyond just the consulting industry, the author details out the mentality that is required to become a self-made millionaire, a mindset that is valuable to have whether you actually want a million dollars or not

Key Concepts

As I mentioned, while the book is technically written on the consulting industry, there is a lot of value to be taken away that can be applied to any area of life.

The major concepts in this book are that to have success, you have to have integrity, build relationships, and focus on growth. Form your own personal strategy for what you want in your life, and stick to it, no matter what other opportunities may come your way.

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The Importance of Reading

 

Quiet ReadingReading

It was one of the easiest things you could do as a kid to get banished by your classmates to the corner of the cafeteria. It was what your mother constantly harped on you to do more often.

It was definitively not cool.

Only geeks read books for fun, let alone reading for class. But personally, I loved it (geek?). I read everything I could get my hands on, and although it was mostly science fiction/fantasy (geek), it set the groundwork for my reading habits today.

In fact, some of history’s greatest leaders were avid readers at a young age.

Napoleon Bonaparte was a voracious reader as a youth, often skipping meals to save money to buy more books, and frequently skipping out on activities with his classmates to “read everything that he could about the most ambitious leaders of the ancient world” (Napoleon: A Life). He copied many of his leadership tactics from what he read about Julius Caesar and Alexander the Great, and even packed up over 100 books to take along with him in his Egyptian campaign to study and learn more about his upcoming adversaries.

Other historical readers include Theodore Roosevelt, who would read hundreds of books a yearThomas Jefferson donated his personal library to the Library of Congress it was so big. And Abraham Lincoln schooled himself as a youth by waking up early every day to read before he started his chores around the farm.

But it’s not just our past leaders that read to get ahead; the titans of our current era are also enormous proponents of reading. Warren Buffet, one of the richest men on Earth, has said “Of all the investments I ever made, buying that book [Intelligent Investor] was the best.

Mark Zuckerberg has a goal of reading one book every other week (2 books/month), and even started a book club for people to join him along the way. And studies show that the average Fortune 500 CEO reads about 4-5 books a month, or one book every week.

Turns out, reading is the single best thing you can do to succeed in life. There is nothing better you can do for yourself and your self-improvement than to read. Prodigiously.

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Reading opens up your mind to new ideas, allows you to study some of the great figures in history (and today), and serves as astimulus for your own mental creativity and development. Some of my best ideas have come to me while reading a book, ideas that I never would have come up with on my own.

Reading has changed my life completely. It hasn’t directly changed my circumstances, but it has changed how I think and feel about those circumstances. It’s made me bolder, more self-aware, better at critical thinking, and all around a better human being. It has allowed me to realize my ambitions, and it’s why I created this page in the first place.

This page is dedicated to becoming the best ‘you’ that you can, so that you can make a difference in this world. Inherent in this idea, is that in order to become the best you can, you must keep learning.

Your Personal Education

Reading is about developing your mental prowess. It’s about the long game. It’s an investment in your own education and in your future.

Reading is the education you choose for yourself. No one teaches you in school how to leverage being an introvert. Or how to build a company from scratch. How to prioritize your day, or how to best invest your money. When you read, you get to set your own coursework and decide what you want to learn about.

School teaches you the technical knowledge you need: where to put commas, how to add to 100, how combustion occurs. It teaches you how to study and prepare, and of course there is the social aspect. But it doesn’t always teach you the philosophies, strategies, and tactics you will need to thrive. It’s that soft knowledge that sets you apart from the pack, and its knowledge that you can only ever acquire from either a mentor or a book.

Or, your book can be your mentor.

Your Personal Mentor

The best way to get up to speed on a new topic is always to learn if from someone who has been there before. The bad news is that finding that person at the moment you need them can be very difficult, let along convincing them to distill all of their knowledge down for you.

The good news is that everything has been done before. Someone has gone through the exact thing you are struggling with or want to learn about, and at some point someone wrote down what they did and learned in a book.

“The biggest reason people don’t succeed is because they don’t expose themselves to existing information”

– Jim Rohn

For the most part, this is knowledge and information you can trust. People can be full of it sometimes, and you have to be careful with what advice you take from people you meet. But by nature, books force authors to explain their thinking in a clear, conscience manner, or else it won’t get published. This third-party verification system means that you are getting the best of what someone has to offer, generally speaking. I’ve definitely read some texts that don’t fit this description – but those are the exceptions, not the rule.

You don’t have to reinvent the wheel or always go to the horse’s mouth.

Your Personal Time

And the best part of all of this, for an introvert, is that you’re good at it. We’re natural readers.

Picking up and digging into a book is something that introverts naturally excel at. It’s a passive exercise. You can sit back, retreat into yourself, not worry about interacting with anyone else, and just think while you read. It’s your quiet time, which makes reading to learn and grow an inherent strength.

A couple of excerpts from Susan Cain’s book, Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking:

 

“[Introverts] are the ones who prefer listening to speaking, reading to partying; who innovate and create but dislike self-promotion; who favor working on their own over brainstorming in teams”
“[Introverts have] been shown to excel at something psychologists call ‘insightful problem solving.’ Introverts think before they act, digest information thoroughly, stay on task longer, give up less easily, and work more accurately.”
“Introverts feel ‘just right’ with less stimulation, as when they sip wine with a  close friend, solve a crossword puzzle, or read a book […] your typical introvert would rather spend her vacation reading on the beach than partying on a cruise ship”
“[S]tay as true to yourself as you possible can – starting by creating as many ‘restorative niches’ as possible in your daily life. ‘Restorative Niche’ is […] the place you go when you want to return to your true self”

We know introverts need time to themselves, and through reading, you can find your quiet time, and still learn from some of the greatest minds the world has ever seen. Overtime, you will start to sense your mental perceptions shift. You begin brainstorming your own ideas, connecting themes across books, and relating what you are reading to things you encounter every day in life. It’s a very personal process that you can use to recharge yourself.

Admittedly, reading a book each week, or even each month, is not easy. Becoming the best ‘you’ you can be requires a dedication and consistency of effort. It’s easy to pull up YouTube or Netflix for an hour or two. It’s a bit harder to crack open a book and read about the character of George Washington.

But it’s the hard things in life that are always most worth doing.

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Now of course, the activity of reading is only half the battle. You have to also read analytically– reading for ideas and intellect, not just entertainment. Really internalizing what you read and looking for ways to apply it.

This leads to the second, and largest, part. Eventually, you must do something with what you are learning. You have to use and apply it, or it is all just academic. But before you act, you must know. Action without direction is meaningless.

So you want to leverage your strengths to make a change in your life? How about you start with a book. For as the famous quote goes:

“Not all readers are leaders, but all leaders are readers”

– Harry Truman

Systems for Your Mind with Calendars

This is a follow up to last week’s post, but is less focused around reducing your stress levels as much as it is about knowledge retention.

I talked before about creating systems to reduce your stress and free up more time, by putting aspects of your life on auto-pilot. These systems do the work for you, so you don’t have to waste any mental capacity on making unnecessary decisions.

But there are other systems you can implement that function more like a calendar. Calendar’s aren’t there to get things done for you, they are for jogging your memory, helping you to remember to do something that you otherwise would have forgotten or not accounted for.

We all use systems like this for remembering certain things: birthdays, meeting minutes, doctors’ appointments. But they can be extended for use in so many more areas of life:

Note Taking

I like to think I read a decent amount, averaging around a book a week. The intent here is not just to read for readings sake – I read to learn. But you only have so much mental capacity. It would be impossible to think you can remember all that you read and be able to access that information on a moment’s notice.

Even Einstein himself, when asked what the speed of sound was, responded: “I don’t know. I don’t burden my memory with such facts that I can easily find in any textbooks.”

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Hustle Gang Over Err’thang: On Time Effectiveness

We all want to get things done, and we all want them done yesterday. We want action, we want to kick ass and take names. But very few of us do, or at least not on a consistent basis, and the ones that do get things done seem superhuman to us – how can they possibly accomplish so much? We write it off that they are special, supremely talented, have a team of people working behind the scenes while they sit pretty in their palace chair. And yes, some truly have other-worldly talent. But the rest are just like us – normal people, who are just incredibly effective with their time.

It is often easy to get caught up in the buzz of efficiency and productivity, of always focusing on doing things faster. But it is entirely possible to be extremely efficient at doing a task, but doing the complete wrong task. You have to be shrewd with your time, not just fast.

“Efficiency is doing things right. Effectiveness is doing the right things.”

– Peter Drucker

This is time effectiveness. Focusing on what is most important and getting that done in an expedited fashion, versus just getting the next thing on your to-do list crossed off (unless, of course, your to-do list is already prioritized, in which case congratulations, you can go ahead to the second half of this piece. No $200). It is a blend of planning and execution, speed and precision. It’s doing the right thing, doing it the right way, and being urgent in its completion. Continue reading

Analysis: Washington – A Life

Washington_A_Life_book_coverSurveyor, Farmer, Statesman, General, President, Father of a Nation. George Washington held many titles throughout the course of his life, but few in the annals of history can claim the latter. He is a figure of legendary stature, both today and even amongst his peers. It is well known that part of this mystic and legend comes from Washington’s stoic, calm nature (the book’s author refers to him as ‘The Man of Marble’), but there is a lot more to him than that. And that is what makes Washington – A Life (Ron Chernow) so great, and while I feel it was important enough to warrant this post. While it is a beast of a book (comes in at almost a thousand pages), it is a text  that should go on anyone’s to-read list who considers themselves a student of improvement and success, and who seeks to make an impact in the world. It is most definitely going on my Resources list.

The title of the text is very apropos to the subject matter, as this is a book purely on George Washington’s life. There is very little actual analysis in the book, even though it’s large enough to rival the Bible in density. Chernow simply relates facts and actions from Washington’s life, mostly through letters and first-hand accounts from the era. The amount of research and detail that must have gone into this book is simply staggering. But Chernow leaves it up to you to analyze Washington and draw your own conclusions on what made him so great. And because there is such a wealth of information here, its not that hard to do, and by book’s end you are left with a very clear picture of just who George Washington was and what it was about him that made him such a great leader. Continue reading

5 Impact Reads of 2014

With 2014 winding to a close in the coming weeks, I wanted to take the time to list my top 5 books from this past year. As I’ve stated before, 2014 has been a big paradigm shift for me in how I view the world and my place in it. And books have been a key catalyst in enacting this change.

I started off the year with the goal of reading 10 books. While that may seem modest, and by most accounts, it is (check Ryan Holiday or Tim Ferriss. Its ridiculous), to me this was a big jump forward in making the effort to read regularly and often. I took stock of recommended book lists from seemingly every business or thought leader, and just dove in.

I ended up reaching 18 books this year, so paring this down to five is not as difficult a task as I initially thought, although I am looking to up the difficulty curve on myself next year by shooting for 40. Going to get a lot of run out of the Audible app on my phone, which is really great for long drives or any form of travel.

Last thing to note, at this point in my life I am more focused on breadth over depth, building a knowledge and philosophical base from which to build upon as I move throughout my life. These books are a snapshot of where I am in life right now, and what was most meaningful to me, not simply the best 5 books I read. In no particular order:

The Goal – Just wrote up a review on this one you can check out, but in summary, 1) Don’t take old assumptions at face value. The world is constantly evolving, our thinking should mirror that. 2) Identify your goal, and align everything you do to that goal. If something doesn’t help you achieve your ends, its a distraction.

4-Hour Workweek – Speaking of Tim and Mr. Holiday, both make an appearance here. This book, by Tim Ferriss, is a book that in my opinion needs to be taken in from a distance. Dig out the key concepts laid out, not all the shiny details and promises of easy money. The core of this book is to first go after what you really want, and effectiveness is the tool to get you there. Not efficiency, but effectiveness. Tim is a big proponent of the Pareto Principle, and the first half of the book is where this really shines. Very easy read, and again, seeing the big picture with this book is key.

Money: Master the Game – Same opening line as 4HWW: don’t take this book as a prescription. Take it as a vitamin. Money and investing is not a topic I am broadly familiar with, but something I know is critical to have a degree of familiarity with. Tony Robbins does a great job of laying out some of the basic principles of personal finance and investing, and definitely pumps his shine into the book. Just use your own judgement and take some of the finer details with a grain of salt. Times are always changing. But a great starting point, without having to take any of the mind-numbing Finance classes at school.

The Obstacle Is the Way – By Ryan Holiday, this is a quick, but highly effective read. Ryan does a great job in summarizing the Stoic viewpoint, which is essentially that life is 10% what happens to you, and 90% how you respond to it. People like Teddy Roosevelt aren’t born great, but they become great through their self discipline in making  lemonade from the proverbial lemon. A great primer on the practical philosophy of Stoicism, a topic I plan on really delving into in the coming year.

Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking – This one might go down as the best book I’ve ever read. Being a functioning introvert myself, this was a quake book for me, one that totally shattered any preconceived notions I held on introversion, and how I dealt with it. A more detailed review will be soon to come, but Susan Cain knocks this one out of the park. A must read for anyone who often finds themselves on the quieter side of life, and still highly recommended for the social butterflies, as Susan addresses not only the discrepancies between introversion/extroversion, but how to understand the other side and co-exist. Not everyone is meant to be highly vocal, and not everyone that is highly vocal is meant to be a leader. Can’t speak highly enough of this book.

But there you have it, my personal top 5 books of the year. Share your thoughts or any books that impacted you that I should look into for next year down below, or you can always reach me at pursueimpact@gmail.com.

 

Book Review: The Goal

Time for a book post. I view reading as being instrumental to the self-education process; who better to learn from than the great people and thinkers of the world? These book review posts are not going to be a regular occurrence, theoretically. They are just meant to discuss books that have been very influential for me and helped shape or alter my current way of thinking. Not every book you read is going to change your life, and so not every book read is going to be mentioned here. Just the heavy hitters.

For the first book review, I wanted to start with a book that is somewhat simple, yet had a pretty profound impact on my mind and thought process. The Goal was actually assigned reading for a class in my business program is one of the first books that I really read critically (I highly recommend it if you are new to this world). Since then I have come a long way in my note-taking abilities, and refined an indexing system for cataloging those notes. But that is for another time. Until then, ladies and gentlemen: The Goal.

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